Fall 2015

 

IRST 10101:01
MWF  9:25-10:15
Mary O’Callaghan
Beginning Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.   Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.   In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology- based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

IRST 10101:02
MWF  10:30-11:20
Mary O’Callaghan
Beginning Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.   Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.   In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology- based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

IRST 10101:03
MWF  11:30-12:20
John Woods
Beginning Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.   Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.   This class meets 3 days-a-week.   In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology- based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

IRST 10102:01
MWF  10:30-11:20
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish II

 

Second semester of instruction in the Irish language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.   In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

IRST 20103:01

MWF  12:50-1:40

Mary O’Callaghan

Intermediate Irish

 

 

Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th- century literary work in the original Irish.

 

 

 

IRST 20115:01

MWF  2:00-2:50

Tara MacLeod

Irelands Edge:  Ireland’s Island and Gaeltacht Culture

 

This  course  explores  the  society,  culture,  heritage  and  literature  of  Gaeltacht  communities  (Irish speaking communities) and uses the Aran Islands, Irish speaking islands off Ireland’s west coast, as its case study.   Students will learn about Gaeltacht life, culture, traditions, historic landmarks  and efforts to modernize the communities.  This course will take a multidisciplinary approach by studying film and television, visual arts, performing arts, archeology, folklore, history, politics and literature to deconstruct the competing and conflicting images of the communities.  his course includes a travel component.  Students will visit the Aran Islands to deepen their knowledge of the area and carry out independent research.   Students taking this class must be enrolled in or have completed IRLL/IRST

10101 Beginning Irish I.

 

 

 

IRST 20116:01

MW  2:00-3:15

Amy Mulligan

Irish Literature and Culture I

 

Ireland  can lay claim to one of the most extensive,  unique,  and oldest literatures  in Europe.   By engaging with a wide range of literary texts from the medieval and early modern periods (ca. 800-

1800), participants will consider how changing social, cultural, literary and intellectual contexts, in terms  of  both  authors  and  audiences,  have  dramatically  transformed  Ireland’s  literature  over  the centuries.   By looking at authors ranging from heroic bards and literary monks to lamenting wives and satirizing schoolmasters, we will examine the dynamics of production and the voices that speak to us from Ireland’s  past.   Additionally,  by thinking  about the identities  of those who have more recently translated and edited the versions of the texts we will read, by questioning the different topics that scholars have chosen to explore, and by articulating our own responses to often arresting works from the Irish literary tradition, we will begin to understand the complexities and rich possibilities inherent in experiencing these literary masterpieces in a time and place very different from medieval or early modern Ireland.  Participants will read both primary literary texts, which may include but are

 

not limited to The Táin, stories from Early Irish Myths and Sagas, poems from An Duanaire:  Poems of the Dispossessed, Merriman’s Midnight Court, as well as a number of critical essays.  Participants will be required to write several short response papers, to compose discussion questions to help direct class conversations, and to write 2 papers (4-5 pp. and 6-7 pp.)

 

 

IRST 20590:01

MW  11:00-12:15

Patrick Griffin and Ian Kuijt

The Irish in the World

 

This  class  provides  an  educational  and  entertaining  reconfiguration  of  the  historical  spread  and cultural importance of the Irish as part of the 2st-century transnational world.  Based on comparative perspectives  with other emigrations,  such as people from 19th century Italy and Germany into the New World, our study of the Irish helps students to understand the human narrative of resettlement, the national and global policies of settlement and resettlement, and the global impact of the spread of the Irish into many areas of the world.  Based on lectures, films and presentations, we explore some fundamental historical questions, such as how are the Irish Famine, emigration, and economic developments  of  the  18-20th  centuries  interconnected,  and  how  did  the  Irish  diaspora  shape  the historical and cultural trajectory of America.   We explore a range of themes relevant to other large- scale population migrations, such as the impact of the Irish spread on trans-Atlantic social memory and global economies across time and space.

 

 

IRST 30107:01

TR  9:30-10:45

Peter McQuillian

The Hidden Ireland

 

The Hidden Ireland denotes both a book and a concept.  The book was written by Daniel Corkery in

1924 and was an immediate success as it encapsulated a version of Irish history that had not hitherto been available to the general public; it is still considered  to be a classic of its kind.   The concept promoted  the notion that history should emanate from “below” and should not be confined to the elites  and  governing  classes.     Both  book  and  concept  have  had  a  profound  impact  on  our understanding of Irish identity, Irish history and Irish literature.  This course will examine the book in depth  and utilize  it to open  a window  on the Hidden  Ireland  of the 18th century.   The cultural, historical, and literary issues raised by the book will be studied in the context of the poetry of the period.  Poetry will be read in translation.

 

 

 

IRST 30325:01

TR  2:00-3:15

Rory Rapple

Medieval Ireland

 

Consideration  of the period between 950 and 1400 is of crucial importance  in understanding  Irish history.  This course not only covers the range of continuities and radical discontinuities that marked Ireland's development during this time, but charts the attempted conquest of the entire country by the English Crown.  The lecture series also seeks to answer a number of questions.  Why did the Papacy give the English Crown sovereignty over Ireland?  Why did a country like Ireland, on the verge of attaining political and economic centralization, not organize better resistance to English attempts to subdue  it?    Why  did  the  English  colony  fail  to  prove  more  successful  in  exerting  its  will  over indigenous Irish potentates?  Culturally the period also witnessed the growing assimilation of English

 

invaders to the norms of Gaelic Irish politics and society.   Lastly, events in Ireland had a serious influence on developments in England, Wales and Scotland, provoking, amongst other things, the fall of the Plantagenet dynasty and an attempted invasion by King Robert I of Scotland.

 

 

 

IRST 30416:01

TR  9:30-10:45

Rory Rapple

Tudor England:  Politics and Honor

 

The period from 1485 to 1603, often feted as something of a ‘Golden Age’ for England, saw that country undergo serious changes that challenged the traditional ways in which the nation conceived of itself.  These included the break from Rome, the loss of England’s foothold in France, and the unprecedented  experience  of  monarchical  rule  by  women.    Each  of  these  challenges  demanded creative political responses and apologetic strategies harnessing intellectual resources from classical, Biblical, legal, chivalric and ecclesiastical sources.  This course will examine these developments.  It will  also  look  at  how  the  English,  emerging  from  under  the  shadow  of  the  internecine  dynastic warfare of the fifteenth century, sought to preserve political stability and ensure a balance between continuity  and change, and, furthermore,  how individuals  could use these unique circumstances  to their own advantage.

 

 

IRST 30423:01

MW  2:00-3:15

Sean McGraw

Irish Politics:  1916-2009:  From Colonialism to the Celtic Tiger and Beyond

 

Ireland, a country rich in history, has undergone dramatic changes in the twentieth century beginning with its fight for independence  and culminating  in its meteoric rise during the Celtic Tiger years. What explains Ireland's distinctive political trajectory and how does it compare to other European nations?    How  should  we  understand  the  Celtic  Tiger,  the  rapid  series  of  social,  economic  and political transformations  that have occurred within Ireland since the 1990s?   This course explores these questions by studying the political actors and institutional settings of Irish politics, the nature of political influence and the shaping of political priorities, and the forces that shape policy outcomes.  It will  address   such  critical   issues   as  the  legacies   of  colonialism   and  civil  war,  nationalism, democratization,  the relationship between the Church and State, the Northern Ireland Troubles and the European Union.  While the course focuses on the Republic of Ireland, it will adopt a broad comparative perspective, situating the country both within the wider global context and within the political science literature.

 

 

 

IRST 30440:01

MWF  9:25-10:15

James Smyth

The Northern Ireland Troubles

 

This course explores the history of the six north-eastern counties of Ireland which became "Northern Ireland"  in  1920/1.  Northern  Ireland  remained  part  of  the  United  Kingdom  and  had  a  built-in Protestant unionist majority, while the Catholic minority, alienated from the state from the outset, looked  across  the  new  border  and  to  Dublin,  capital  of  the  Irish  Free  State,  as  the  site  of  their allegiance.  Northern  Ireland  was  thus,  from  the  beginning,  dysfunctional,  scarred  by  sectarian violence and systematic discrimination in housing and employment. After examining the origins of the state and the early decades of it existence, the class will turn to its main concern, “the troubles,”

 

which  broke  out  in  the  late  1960s.  The  major  episodes  under  scrutiny  include  the  civil  rights movement, Bloody Sunday, the hunger strikes, and the Good Friday Peace Agreement.

 

 

IRST 40115:01

TR  3:30-6:15

Briona Nic Dhiarmada

Documenting Ireland

 

In its manifold forms, from the newsreel to the feature; film is a major source of evidence for, and an important influence upon, contemporary history, and a vivid means of bringing the recent past to life? The Historian and Film, Paul Smith ed. Cambridge University Press.  This course will examine how modern Irish history has been presented in both documentary and feature film from the silent era to the present day.  It will interrogate the possibilities and pitfalls of history for film-makers and look at how Irish history has been presented to a mass audience through cinema and television.  Films discussed will include Irish Destiny (1926), The Dawn (1936), Anne Devlin (1984), Michael Collins (1996), The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2003), Mise Eire (1959), Saoirse/Freedom (1961), Insurrection (1966) A Television History of Ireland, The Troubles (1981), Seachtar na Casca.

 

 

 

IRST 40316:01

TR  12:30-1:45

Diarmuid Ó Giolláin

Folklore, Literature and Irish National Culture

 

The ideological character of the 19th century concept of folklore allowed it to transcend the social category of peasants from whom it was largely recorded.  This course will look at the role of folklore in the building of an Irish national culture from the time of the Gaelic Revival.  Programmatic texts in Irish and in English by Douglas Hyde, first president of the Gaelic League, and by Séamus Delargy, director of the Irish Folklore Commission, will be discussed.  It will also look at a later polemical text of the Gaelic writer Máirtín Ó Cadhain directed at what he perceived as the essentialism of Irish folklorists.  No knowledge of the Irish language required.

 

 

 

 

IRST 40433:01

MW  3:30-4:45

Barry McGovern

Joyce and Beckett and the Irish Voice

 

This course will deal with the challenge of reading Joyce and Beckett in a way that gives full relish to the various voices that permeate their works.  These European Modernist works are suffused with an Irish sensibility which is often either ignored or misunderstood.  Joyce’s four great prose masterpieces will be considered with particular emphasis on Dubliners and Ulysses.  Beckett’s prose will be looked at in some  depth  with  particular  emphasis  on the four  stories  or Nouvelles  and  the three  novels Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable.   The strong sense of irony and black humor with which these works are laced will be examined.   The aim of the course is to leave the student with a fresh way of reading and, more particularly, hearing Joyce and Beckett leading to a fuller enjoyment of the work.

 

IRST 60115:01

TR  3:30-6:15

Briona Nic Dhiarmada

Documenting Ireland

 

In its manifold forms, from the newsreel to the feature; film is a major source of evidence for, and an important influence upon, contemporary history, and a vivid means of bringing the recent past to life? The Historian and Film, Paul Smith ed. Cambridge University Press.  This course will examine how modern Irish history has been presented in both documentary and feature film from the silent era to the present day.  It will interrogate the possibilities and pitfalls of history for film-makers and look at how Irish history has been presented to a mass audience through cinema and television.  Films discussed will include Irish Destiny (1926), The Dawn (1936), Anne Devlin (1984), Michael Collins (1996), The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2003), Mise Eire (1959), Saoirse/Freedom (1961), Insurrection (1966) A Television History of Ireland, The Troubles (1981), Seachtar na Casca.

 

 

 

 

IRST 63000:01

TBA Christopher Fox

Irish Studies Graduate Pro Seminar

 

Irish Studies Pro Seminar is built around the Keough-Naughton  Institute for Irish Studies semester- long   Irish   Studies   Seminar   events   (irishstudies.nd.edu).   Students   will   attend   a   program   of internationally  recognized  scholars,  artists,  musicians  and  politicians  addressing  the  Institute  this semester for one hour of class credit.  This course must be taken twice as part of the requirements for a graduate minor in Irish Studies.

 

 

 

IRST 90526:01

W  3:30-6:15

Declan Kiberd

Modern Irish Writing:  Excavating the Present 1950-2010

 

Cultural introversion characterized  Ireland during World War two and after but radical experiment could still be found in the work of overseas-based authors such as Samuel Beckett.  By the 1960s, however, Time magazine could report ‘new spirit in the oul sod’ as society began a process of secularization,  urbanization and feminization  (a more central role for women).   The Irish language was no longer seen as an antique piety but as part of a vibrant counter-culture.  However, the eruption of old conflicts in the North in the closing years of the decade suggested that not everyone was ready for change.  All of these social shifts led to the creation of major works of literature, music, film and dance.  As the twentieth century drew to a close, immigrants arrived from Eastern Europe, Africa and China---Ireland was no longer (if ever it had been) monocultural.  A period of rapid globalization witnessed the ‘worlding’ of Irish writing, only to be followed by a severe economic crisis.  This led some people to return to one of the oldest questions---whether  “Ireland” as a cultural and political project could survive  into the twenty-first  century.   Among  authors  to be studied  will be Samuel Beckett,  Edna  O’Brien,  Brian  Friel,  John  Banville,  Seamus  Heaney,  Derek  Mahon,  Nuala  Ni Dhomhnaill,  Michael Hartnett, Tom Murphy, Frank McGuinness,  John McGahern, Seamus Deane, Eilis Ni Dhuibhne, Marina Carr, Paula Meehan, Conor McPherson,  Roddy Doyle, Seamus Deane, Claire Keegan and Kate Thompson.