Spring 2013

IRST 10101:01

MWF  9:35-10:25

Mary O’Callaghan

Beginning Irish I

 

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. 

 

 

IRST 10101:02

MWF  10:40-11:30

Tara MacLeod

Beginning Irish I

 

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. 

 

 

IRST 10101:03

MWF  12:50-1:40

Mary O’Callaghan

Beginning Irish I

 

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. 

 

 

IRST 10102:01

MWF  9:35-10:25

Noírín Ní Laighin

Beginning Irish II

 

Second semester of instruction in the Irish language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

 

IRST 20103:01

MWF  10:40-11:30

Mary O’Callaghan

Intermediate Irish

 

Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.

 

 

IRST 20103:02

MWF  12:50-1:40

Tara MacLeod

Intermediate Irish

 

Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.

 

 

IRST 20203:01

TR  9:30-10:45

Brian Ó Conchubhair

Advanced Readings in Irish Culture

 

An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language.  We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20103).  Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts.  Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax.  Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20103 in order to take this class.  At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.

 

 

IRST 20223:01

TR  3:30-4:45

Diarmuid Ó Giolláin

Introduction to Irish Folklore

 

This course will discuss the 19th century concept of folklore and its application in Ireland. ‘Irish Folklore’ is usually understood in terms of three main and related domains: ‘folk narrative’ (or oral literature), ‘folk belief’ (or popular religion) and ‘material folk culture.’  These will be examined with special emphasis placed on narrative.  Representative oral narrative texts from the Gaelic tradition will be studied in translation.

 

 

IRST 20316:01

TR  2:00-2:50

Patrick Griffin, Ian Kuijt, Brian Ó Conchubhair

The Irish in Us: Comparative Perspectives on Being Irish and Irish-American

 

This class provides an educational and entertaining reflection on the deep historical and cultural intertwining of America and Ireland, and the extent to which our world is shaped by Irish people, culture and heritage.  Drawing upon the skills of three Notre Dame professors, each of which has different interests, in this class we explore comparative perspectives of the cultural, economic, and political context of being Irish and Irish-American. In this class we seek to provide new perspectives on the interconnections between Ireland and America, in the past, present and future.  Based on lectures and presentations, we explore some fundamental historical questions, such as how were the Irish Famine, emigration, and economic developments of the 18-20th centuries interconnected, and how did the Irish Diaspora shape the historical and cultural trajectory of America.  Similarly, we explore what it is to be Irish and Irish-American, be it through family history, or growing up watching Notre Dame football. What are the interconnections between regional Irish identities, language, and history?  Finally we explore how American, let alone global, culture is being actively shaped by Irish culture (such as literature, theater, film, music), and the extent to which this is a dynamic process. Looking at it from a different perspective, how has the reintroduction of such an idealized form of Irishness to Ireland, impacted the country?  Drawing upon literature, history, archaeology and folklore, this class will illustrate the different ways we can explore and conceive of the past and present world of Ireland and Irish-America.  Seeking answers to these questions offers students a fascinating opportunity to learn more about Ireland, America, and the connections between these cultures and peoples.

 

 

IRST 20519:01

TR  5:00-6:15 

John Dillon

Irish Love Stories

 

This course traces the trajectory of the love poem in Ireland from the Middle Ages to the present day. We will begin with texts such as Liadain and Cuirithir (9th century) continuing through the late medieval genre of the Dánta Grádha as well as considering the corpus of love songs (Amhráin Ghrá) from the oral tradition before looking at the development of the modern love poem in the work of poets from W.B. Yeats to the contemporary Irish language poet Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill.  All Irish language texts will be read in translation.

 

 

IRST 30116:01

MW  1:30-2:45 

James Hamrick

Banks, Bailouts and Irish Literature

 

This interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between Irish literature and economics from the 18th century to the boom times of the Celtic Tiger and the fallout from the recent banking crisis.  The course will situate contemporary Irish culture in relation to earlier periods, but also in the context of the Irish government’s bailout of the banks and the subsequent European Union-IMF ‘bailout’ of the sovereign state of Ireland.  We will consider works by Jonathan Swift, Edmund Burke, William Butler Yeats and James Joyce, as well as contemporary fiction by Roddy Doyle, non-fiction by Fintan O’Toole and film related to more recent developments.  For the past three hundred years, Irish national identity has been closely connected to its economic relationships with the rest of the world. In the 18th century, for example, Ireland’s colonial and mercantilist relationship with Great Britain, particularly the mandate to use British manufactured goods, sparked the first stirrings of nationalism among Anglo-Irish writers like Swift. Much later, in stories like “After the Race,” Joyce would explore Irish identity in the context of global capitalism.  More recently, during the rapid economic expansion of the 1990s and 2000s, the Irish developed a self-confident, European sense of themselves. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, however, the Irish government was saddled with enormous debt from bailing out Ireland’s banks and the Irish people faced severe, IMF-mandated cuts to spending on pensions, social services and education, exacerbating the economic downturn.  This situation, which is ongoing, re-opened old antagonisms in Irish culture while simultaneously opening new ones relating to race, immigration and Ireland’s place within the European Union.  In addition to literary and cultural analysis, the course will include topics in mortgage securitization, banking, monetary policy and the macroeconomic effects of government expenditures.

 

 

IRST 30320:01

TR  2:00-3:15

Bríona Nic Dhiarmada

Screening the Irish Troubles

 

This course will look at how political conflict in Ireland from the 1916 Rebellion and the War of Independence up to and including what became known as “The Troubles” in the North of Ireland has been represented on the screen.  Students will analyze a wide variety of cinematic texts, mainstream commercial Hollywood features as well as independent Irish and British films.  Documentary film will also be analyzed.  Certain seminal events such as Bloody Sunday and the 1981 Hunger Strikes which have a diverse representational history on screen will be given particular attention.  Among the films discussed will be Mise Eire, SaoirseMichael CollinsThe Wind that Shakes the BarleySome Mother’s SonIn the Name of the Father, and Bloody Sunday.

 

 

IRST 30371:01

MW  10:40-11:30

Christopher Fox

Introduction to Irish Writers

 

As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers.  Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present.  Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Brian Friel, and John McGahern.  We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers' works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest.  Themes to be explored include representations of national character and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.” Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.

 

 

IRST 30535:01

TR  9:30-10:45

Abigail Palko

Transatlantic Odysseys/Postcolonial Masculinities: Reading Joyce and Walcott

 

This course begins with the premise that the twentieth-century situations of Ireland and the Caribbean bore more than a passing resemblance to each other.  In a 1979 interview, Derek Walcott (the first Caribbean writer to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature) claimed affinity with Irish writers on the grounds of a shared colonial background:  “I’ve always found some kind of intimacy with the Irish poets because one realised that they were also colonials with the same kind of problem that existed in the Caribbean - Now, with all of that, to have those astounding achievements of genius, whether by Joyce, or Yeats, or Beckett, illustrated that one could come out of a depressed, deprived, oppressed situation, and be defiant and creative at the same time.”  To explore this assertion, we will read selected writings of James Joyce (Irish novelist, short story writer, and essayist) and Derek Walcott (St. Lucian poet, playwright, and essayist).  This comparative reading will highlight their common themes of ethnicity, postcolonial constructions of masculinity, cultural chauvinism, and political inequality. Both work within and against the traditional Western canon, and so our primary focus on their epics, Ulysses and Omeros (we will read selections from each), will consider the ways that Joyce and Walcott are writing back to the imperial center/rewriting the imperial canon, employing its literary techniques and traditions in their works. Both writers thematically investigate the dichotomy between colonizer and colonized, the interplay between their own culture and Western civilization writ large, and the influence of island geography on their societies.  Their writing exposes the lasting wounds - personal, cultural, and political -inflicted by British colonialism in their native lands and the ways that anxieties of masculinity were exacerbated by and contributed to this domination. Our readings of Joyce’s and Walcott’s texts will be guided throughout by the theoretical lens of masculinity studies. This course is open to students interested in exploring the ways that masculinity studies serves as a useful lens for reading Joyce and Walcott and for analyzing the political and cultural ties between their homes (as well as their problematic relationships to those homes); no prior knowledge is assumed.

 

 

IRST 40316:01

TR  11:00-12:15

Diarmuid Ó Giolláin

Folklore, Literature, and Irish National Culture

 

In this course, we will examine various places around the world to which Irish people emigrated either voluntarily or forcibly.  We will read about well-known places such as Britain, the US, and Australia, but also examine other less well-known enclaves, including Barbados, Montserrat, Newfoundland, South Africa, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and New Zealand, among others.  Through these case studies, particular emphasis would be placed on the circumstances surrounding emigration as well as the experiences Irish immigrants had in each of these unique cultural contexts.  We will also consider contemporary Irish life in these locations.  Through the course, we will develop an appreciation for the incredible variability and dynamism of the Irish people and experiences in the diaspora.

 

 

IRST 40513:01

TR  12:30-1:45

Mary Smyth

Culture and Politics of Northern Ireland

 

This course explores the politics of culture, and the cultures of politics, in the North of Ireland during the twentieth century. Using a multiplicity of genres - drama, fiction, poetry, film, painting, and documentary material - we will unravel the history behind partition, the causes of the Troubles, and the nature of the conflict. Among the key moments or events upon which we will concentrate are the Somme, the sinking of the Titanic, Bloody Sunday, the hunger strikes, Drumcree, the Anglo-Irish Agreement, and the Shankill Butchers. Certain key themes will stretch through our semester’s work. Among these are sectarianism, the relationship between violence and culture, the role of religion in the state, borders, hatred, identity, and issues of social and political justice. Some of the writers whose work we will read are Seamus Heaney, Frank McGuinness, Sam Thompson, John Montague, Seamus Deane, Eoin MacNamee, Robert MacLiam Wilson, Colin McCann, and Thomas Kinsella.

 

 

IRST 63000:01

TBA

Christopher Fox

Irish Studies Graduate Pro Seminar

 

Irish Studies Pro Seminar is built around the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies semester-long Irish Studies Seminar events (irishstudies.nd.edu). Students will attend a program of internationally recognized scholars, artists, musicians and politicians addressing the Institute this semester for one hour of class credit.  This course must be taken twice as part of the requirements for a graduate minor in Irish Studies.