Spring 2014

IRST 10101:01
MWF  9:25-10:15
Mary O’Callaghan
Beginning Irish I

 

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.


IRST 10101:02
MWF  10:30-11:20
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.


IRST 10101:03
MWF  12:50-1:40
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required.  This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish.  Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts.  Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods.  Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame.  In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Language and Literature and Irish Studies minors’ requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.

 

IRST 10102:01
MWF  9:25-10:15
Caoimhghin Ó Caoláin
Beginning Irish II

Second semester of instruction in the Irish language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.


IRST 10102:02
MWF  2:00-2:50
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish II

Second semester of instruction in the Irish language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.  This class meets 3 days-a-week.  In lieu of a scheduled 4th class, students work independently on technology-based language/culture projects in the CSLC.


IRST 20103:01
MWF  10:30-11:20
Mary O’Callaghan
Intermediate Irish

Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.


IRST 20203:01
TR  9:30-10:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture

An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language.  We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20103).  Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts.  Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax.  Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20103 in order to take this class.  At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.


IRST 20203:01
TR  3:30-4:45
Diarmuid Ó Giolláin
Introduction to Irish Folklore

This course will discuss the 19th century concept of folklore and its application in Ireland. ‘Irish Folklore’ is usually understood in terms of three main and related domains: ‘folk narrative’ (or oral literature), ‘folk belief’ (or popular religion) and ‘material folk culture.’  These will be examined with special emphasis placed on narrative.  Representative oral narrative texts from the Gaelic tradition will be studied in translation.


IRST 20546:01
TR  3:30-4:45
Simone Hamrick
The Irish Theatre

In this course, we will read a wide range of plays presented on the Irish stage from the 18th century to the present.  We will explore themes such as nationalism, gender and the changing representations of “Irishness,” paying particular attention to connections to Irish history.  Playwrights include Charles Macklin, Dion Boucicault, Oscar Wilde, John Synge, William Butler Yeats, Brien Friel and Martin McDonagh.  Class participation will be of great importance as we will not only be discussing and interpreting the plays but also staging our own performances.


IRST 20547:01
MW  2:00-3:15 
Denise Ayo
The Anglo-Irish Big House

The term “big house” refers to the country mansions that English settlers built in Ireland as a part of England’s colonization of Ireland.  “Anglo-Irish” refers to these settlers and their descendants.  In this course, students will read nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century works that examine the Anglo-Irish big house and discuss the tense relationship between the native Irish and Anglo-Irish. Students will read works that lament the fall of the Anglo-Irish ascendancy such as Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent as well as the incredibly sardonic Good Behaviour by Molly Keane.  We will also investigate Seamus Deane’s suggestion that Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a big house novel and examine how Elizabeth Bowen uses the supernatural to describe her experiences as an Anglo-Irish woman in the mid-twentieth century.  Students will analyze the tenuous position of the Anglo-Irish class that resulted from them being neither the colonizing English nor the colonized Irish and thus disowned by both.  This course will give students a foundation in modern and contemporary Irish literature, history, and culture.


IRST 30121:01
TR  2:00-3:15 
Sarah McKibben
The Literatures of Sixteenth-and Seventeenth-Century Ireland

This new course will explore the various literatures that emerge at a time of dramatic change in early modern (16-17th-century) Ireland, including works originally written in Irish and English ranging from courtly poetry of praise and love for noble patrons to rather less savory justifications of colonial violence.  In tandem with our reading of primary materials (using English translations), we will examine the historiography of the period ranging from older texts to podcasts of papers given in the last two years to grasp key debates and shifts in scholarly understanding; in so doing, we will take up longstanding areas of debate regarding the characteristics of this colonial encounter, the degree to which comparisons are useful or apt, the nature of Irish literary culture, the characteristics of the age, and, if we’re feeling cocky, the modern.  My own particular topics of interest include poet-patron relations, the imposition of English law, and native mechanisms of legitimation; others will emerge as we read a variety of texts together.  While you need not know any Irish (Gaelic) to take this course, you should be prepared to conjoin history and theory, poetry and politics, through historicized close reading while working across genres to produce original criticism in the form of several papers whose topics you will develop yourself.  In fact, that’s the whole point:  finding your own passion and doing work that only you can do!


IRST 30127:01
MW  3:30-4:45
Robert Schmuhl
The Making of Irish America

What is Irish America and how did it develop?  This class will focus on distinct periods of Irish and American interaction in the United States from early emigration times (with its emphasis on manual labor and service work) to involvement in politics (especially in large cities) and, after years of bias and bigotry, widespread participation in American business and industry.  Why do we see the rapid changes within this particular ethnic group?  What characteristics of Irish life contributed to those changes?  What American traits were significant in the formation of Irish America?  The class will approach these questions and others from a variety of perspectives:  historical, political, literary, journalistic, and economic.  Assigned readings will reflect the interdisciplinary orientation of the course.  There will be mid-term and final examinations as well as a major research paper on a specific aspect of the Irish-American experience.


IRST 30224:01
MW  2:00-3:15
Amy Mulligan
Travels to Medieval Holy Lands, Otherworlds and New Worlds

One of the most popular genres of medieval literature was the travel tale, and Celtic, Norse and British authors created an exciting range of stories about far-flung, fantastical, and holy or heavenly places, and the experiences of quite normal people in these often really abnormal places.  While these texts generally stage transformations, meetings, and confrontations with new peoples, landscapes and ideas at geographically remote sites, the narratives typically lead audience members to reflect on issues of identity and belief that are actually very close to home.  Analyzing the role of travel and visits to different worlds across several types of texts (legendary histories and origin accounts, hagiographies, adventure and voyage tales, sagas, pilgrimage accounts, etc.) we will identify several of the universal attributes, styles, compositional goals and motifs found in travel literature.  We will also explore the differences between, for instance, secular and sacred travel tales, with particular attention to the role of the audience, the reader who undertakes an imaginative, textual journey by turning a book’s pages or listening to a tale’s oral performance.  Participants will read both primary literary texts (all available in English translation), as well as a number of critical essays.  Primary texts (some excerpted) may include but are not limited to Lebor Gabála Érenn (Book of Invasions of Ireland), Acallam na Senórach (Colloquy of the Ancients), Navigatio Brendani (Voyage of St. Brendan), Irish immrama (voyage tales), the Prologue to Snorri Sturluson’s Gylfaginning (Fooling of Gylfi), the Norse Vínland sagas, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain), the Welsh Mabinogi, the Travels of Sir John Mandeville, and a pilgrimage account (TBD).


IRST 30302:01
TR  9:30-10:45
Peter McQuillan
Advanced Irish 1

This course builds on the reading skills that students have acquired in their first four semesters of Irish.  The course will be based on the reading of selected short stories from both Gearrscéalta an Chéid and Gearrscéalta ár Linne.  The aim is for students to be proficient in reading at advanced level C1 of  “Teastas Eorpach na Gaeilge” (The European Certificate of Irish Language).

IRST 30325:01
TR  11:00-12:15
Rory Rapple
Medieval Ireland

Consideration of the period between 950 and 1400 is of crucial importance in understanding Irish history.  This course not only covers the range of continuities and radical discontinuities that marked Ireland’s development during this time, but charts the attempted conquest of the entire country by the English Crown.  The lecture series also seeks to answer a number of questions.  Why did the Papacy give the English Crown sovereignty over Ireland?  Why did a country like Ireland, on the verge of attaining political and economic centralization, not organize better resistance to English attempts to subdue it?  Why did the English colony fail to prove more successful in exerting its will over indigenous Irish potentates?  Culturally the period also witnessed the growing assimilation of English invaders to the norms of Gaelic Irish politics and society.  Lastly, events in Ireland had a serious influence on developments in England, Wales and Scotland, provoking, amongst other things, the fall of the Plantagenet dynasty and an attempted invasion by King Robert I of Scotland.


IRST 30371:01
MW  10:30-11:20
Christopher Fox
Introduction to Irish Writers

As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers.  Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present.  Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Brian Friel, and John McGahern.  We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers’ works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest.  Themes to be explored include representations of national character and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.”  Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.


IRST 30413:01
MWF  9:25-10:15
James Smyth
British History, 1660-1800

This course of lectures and readings concentrates on British (that is, Scottish as well as English) history from the restoration of monarchy in 1660 to the great crisis detonated by the French Revolution and war in the 1790s.  Themes include the politics of Protestant dissent, political ideologies, the role of parliament, Jacobitism, and the rise of the radical parliamentary reform movement.


IRST 30423:01
MW  12:30-1:45
Sean McGraw
Irish Politics 1916-2009:  From Colonialism to the Celtic Tiger and Beyond

Ireland, a country rich in history, has undergone dramatic changes in the twentieth century beginning with its fight for independence and culminating in its meteoric rise during the Celtic Tiger years. What explains Ireland’s distinctive political trajectory and how does it compare to other European nations?  How should we understand the Celtic Tiger, the rapid series of social, economic and

political transformations that have occurred within Ireland since the 1990s?  This course explores these questions by studying the political actors and institutional settings of Irish politics, the nature of political influence and the shaping of political priorities, and the forces that shape policy outcomes.  It will address such critical issues as the legacies of colonialism and civil war, nationalism, democratization, the relationship between the Church and State, the Northern Ireland Troubles and the European Union.  While the course focuses on the Republic of Ireland, it will adopt a broad comparative perspective, situating the country both within the wider global context and within the political science literature.


IRST 30430:01
MW  5:05-6:20
Jessica Lumsden
Irish Secret Societies in the Atlantic World

This course examines the history of Irish secret societies both in Ireland and in a broader Atlantic world.  We will begin with the early oath bound agrarian societies such as the Whiteboys and move forward through the nineteenth century studying groups such as the Defenders, Rockites, Ribbonmen, Fenians and Molly Maguires.  As we study these groups in their historical contexts, we will survey the shifting political and social landscapes of Ireland, the British Empire, and the Atlantic World. This course also addresses the question:  how do we as historians research groups whose nature means they leave behind minimal written records?


IRST 63000:01
TBA
Christopher Fox
Irish Studies Graduate Pro Seminar

Irish Studies Pro Seminar is built around the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies semester-long Irish Studies Seminar events (irishstudies.nd.edu). Students will attend a program of internationally recognized scholars, artists, musicians and politicians addressing the Institute this semester for one hour of class credit.  This course must be taken twice as part of the requirements for a graduate minor in Irish Studies.