Undergraduate Program

Four students in a discussion in a Classroom

As Notre Dame undergraduates strive to globalize their education, many are eager to explore the culture, history, language, literature, and politics of a country that has long been a laboratory for such global themes as empire and colonialism, revolution and rebellion, migration, hunger, religious pluralism, conflict resolution, and peacekeeping.

Students in any major and in any college can earn a credential in Irish Studies—either as a minor or a concentration.

Undergraduates who choose either path become part of a welcoming, vibrant Irish Studies community at Notre Dame—both on the Notre Dame home campus and abroad. That community features excellent faculty mentoring, generous scholarships for research and internships, and such extracurriculars as a weekly Speakers and Public Talks series, free tickets to Irish-themed performances at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, and opportunities to meet with visiting faculty, guest writers and artists, and visitors from Ireland's diplomatic corps. Irish Studies undergraduates also receive special consideration for study-abroad and internship opportunities in Ireland.

Irish Studies Minor

Undergraduates in all of the University's colleges—Architecture, Arts and Letters, Engineering, Science, and the Mendoza College of Business—can earn an undergraduate minor in Irish Studies.

Learn more about the minor

Supplementary Major in Global Affairs with an Irish Studies Concentration

The Irish people have always sought to understand themselves as a global community, closely interconnected and invested in the developments of religion, culture, scholarship, economics and trade, and law.

Notre Dame undergraduates who choose to earn a supplementary major in the Keough School of Global Affairs can also choose a "concentration" in Irish Studies.

Learn more about the concentration

 

A Message from the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Amy Mulligan, about Choosing an Irish Studies Minor or Concentration

Amy Mulligan, Associate Professor of Irish Language and Literature, and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Keough-Naughton Institute, speaks to students considering an Irish Studies minor or concentration.

A medievalist by training, Professor Mulligan's own portal to Irish Studies began in her own undergraduate years when she became fascinated by Belfast's modern-day Peace Wall murals.

[Synopsis]  "Irish Studies is global studies. The very first writings by Irish people, in Latin but also in the language of Irish (Gaeilge) all dealt with the larger world, and movement and migration through it. These early Irish people reflected deeply about how they were transformed by travel, migration, and their status as world citizens. Adomnán, for instance, a medieval Irish monk living in the 7th Century CE, on a tiny island off the coast of Scotland, wrote one of the first accounts of travel and pilgrimage to Jerusalem . . . his account is still used by pilgrims of many faiths to Jerusalem today!

"Thus, from the very beginning, Ireland and the Irish saw themselves as transnational beings, interconnected to other peoples, cultures and political, religious and economic systems found throughout the world. The Irish people have always sought to understand themselves as a global community, closely interconnected and invested in the developments of religion, culture, scholarship, economics and trade, and law.

"Here in Irish Studies at Notre Dame—through classes, guest lectures, special events with political leaders, conferences, dance, drama and musical performances, paid internships and opportunities to travel, work and study abroad (with generous scholarships available), we offer a multitude of opportunities to allow Notre Dame undergraduates to experience, and shape, a Global Ireland."